5 Healthy-Hearing Soup Recipes to Get You in the Spirit

January Is National Soup Month — 5 Healthy-Hearing Soup Recipes to Get You in the Spirit

Nutrition is a great way to prevent hearing loss. Read on for great soup recipes that will get your hearing health on sure footing for the coming year.

It’s National Soup Month! What better way to kick it off than with an old Italian proverb?

“Soup does seven things: It takes away hunger, takes away thirst, fills the stomach, cleans the teeth, makes you sleep, makes you slim, and puts color in your cheeks.”

Not enough reason to ladle out some of the good stuff? Here’s another: Many ingredients that go great in soup are great for hearing health!

Soup Recipes for Maintaining Hearing Health

Savor the taste and the hearing health with these five soups that are rich in folate and omega-3 fatty acids. These nutrients ensure your cochlea — the part of your inner ear where sound is converted to signals that get …

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Happy 2018! With Exercise & Better Hearing, Make It Your Best Year Yet

Making Moves for Hearing Health

Search “Top 10 New Year’s resolutions” and what are you sure to find? Lists that often start with “fitness” or “exercise.” With benefits from better skin and stronger bones to weight loss, improved mental health, and more, it’s no wonder that exercise pops up as a perennial New Year’s resolution favorite!

But did you know? Exercise can also help prevent hearing impairment.

So if you or your loved ones are kicking off the new year with physical fitness goals in sight, keep in mind these four tips for better hearing health:  

1. Exercise May Delay Age-Related Hearing Loss

An estimated one of every three adults between ages 65 and 74 lives with hearing impairment, per the National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders, making it a common health challenge among seniors. Research, however, shows that exercise can stave off age-related hearing loss (AHL). One relatively

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When to Get Your Hearing Tested

New Year, New Hearing!

Give Yourself and Your Health the Best Possible Start in 2018. Know the Signs of Hearing Loss and Get Your Hearing Tested!

 

Hearing Loss Is More Common Than You Think

When it comes to communication, hearing is our most critical sense. Even a relatively mild hearing loss can seriously disrupt how we interact and connect with others.

Healthy hearing requires a number of processes in the inner ear and brain to work properly and correctly interpret the sounds you hear. Inner-ear problems, or ear problems in general, can prevent crucial sound information from reaching the brain, leading to confusion and an inability to hear and understand speech.

Quick Hearing Loss Statistics

About 48 million Americans have some degree of hearing loss Hearing loss is more common in those with a history of smoking, binge drinking, and circulatory disorders such as high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes Hearing loss …

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Going for Gold

6 Hearing-Impaired Olympic Competitors

Starting February 9, the world will watch the accumulation of years of hard work and dedication come to a head during intense competitions at the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympic Games. Each athlete has their own unique story, but today we’re focusing on those competitors who have overcome not only the odds but also their hearing loss.

Carlo Orlandi (Italy, Boxing)

Orlandi is said to be the first deaf athlete to compete in the Olympic Games. The boxer was a gold medalist in the 1928 Olympic Games. In 1929 he turned professional, and in the 1930s he held both the Italian and European lightweight titles. He was born a deaf-mute.

Tamika Catchings (USA, Basketball)

The 24-year-old WNBA star was born with a hearing loss and incredible athleticism. She has completed 15 seasons in the WNBA and has earned WNBA Finals MVP honors, as well as the Reynolds Society Achievement …

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Your Brain Needs to Rest. Tinnitus Won’t Let It.

A New Study Finds That Chronic Tinnitus Keeps Your Brain From Resting

An Elusive Subject

Tinnitus has proven to be particularly hard for the medical community to study. It can’t be measured like blood pressure or eyesight, and results from study to study are inconsistent because of the variability of patients’ experiences — the type of sound, which ears are affected, whether it’s debilitating, the duration, even the patient’s age.

Recently, however, researchers at the University of Illinois used functional MRI to search for patterns in the brain function of those with chronic tinnitus, regardless of the patient variables involved. They did, indeed, find something: a difference in a part of the brain called the precuneus.

A Lopsided Relationship

The precuneus is connected to many different networks in the brain. Two of these are the default mode network (DMN) and the dorsal attention network (DAN). The DMN is active when the brain is at rest; the DAN is active when you put …

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